The 2017 season is here!

The farm will be open Thursday July 20th through Sunday July 23, 9AM to 5PM daily.

Further open days to be determined.

Like us on Facebook or sign up for the mailing list to receive updates on the 2017 and future u-pick blueberry seasons.

Watch a brief introduction to our farm:


Watch a tour of the farm:


U-Pick FAQ

When does the season start?
How much do the berries cost?

What do I need to bring?
Do you have any strawberries, raspberries, or other fruits and produce available?
Do you have pre-picked berries available?
What forms of payment do you accept?
Do you have plants for sale?
Why are there field rules?
Why are there roped off areas?
Can I bring my dog?
Can I/my son/my friend/etc. work on your farm for the summer?
Any tips for picking blueberries?
Will blueberries ripen after being picked?
Do you use pesticides on your blueberry plants?
Ick! There's a bug on my berries!
How many varieties of blueberry are at the farm?
What are those small, white, dried up berries?

When does the season start?

The season usually starts mid-July and lasts until the berries run out (typically two weeks). Sign up for the mailing list to receive updates on the farm for the open dates of the upcoming and future seasons.

During the season, we are open 9AM to 5PM. Check website for exact dates of operation.

We are open to the public. (No appointment needed.)

How much do the berries cost?

The price for the 2017 season is $2.50 per pound.

What do I need to bring?

We provide buckets for picking and bags for you to take your berries home in. There are restroom facilities and drinking water available. Bring sunscreen on sunny days - there is little to no shade in the field.

Do you have any strawberries, raspberries, or other fruits and produce available?

No, we only have U-pick blueberries during the season.

Do you have pre-picked berries available?

No, we do not have picked berries available.

What forms of payment do you accept?

We accept cash or check only (no credit or debit).

Do you have plants for sale?

No we do not have an plants for sale.

Why are there field rules?

When you visit please respect the field rules.

They are not only for the protection and health of the blueberry plants; they are for the protection and health of you!

Why are there roped off areas?

There are several reasons areas are roped off: part of the field is contracted out, the berries are not yet ripe (see the answer to "How many varieties of blueberry are at the farm?"), and for your protection from hornets and wasps.

For example, this area was roped off because of a wasp nest in the blueberry bush.
An unpleasant surprise for any picker.

So please remember the ropes are there for a reason!

For your safety, please respect the ropes and warning signs.

Hornets and wasps often make their nest in the field. Native hornets general nest in old rodent holes in the ground (non-native European hornets commonly build their nest in the sides of houses). Paper wasps build structures like the one pictured above.

Please remember that these wasps and hornets serve an important function in the field and in your garden! They feed on caterpillars, aphids, beetle grubs, and flies, all of which can directly harm crops or can transmit plant diseases. To read more on the benefits of living with hornets please read more here.

Can I bring my dog?

Katie, the farm dog, says, "Please leave your dog at home."

Can I/my son/my friend/etc. work on your farm for the summer?

Due to the cost of insurance for non-family workers, we can not afford to employ or accept volunteers on our farm. If you are interested in gaining farming experience, check out the Grow Food (membership fee required), which posts work opportunities on farms. Similarily, you can try WWOOF (Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms; membership fee required) and volunteer on the local farms (must be at least 18 years old).

Seattle Tilth offers volunteer and internship possibilities and suggestions on how to get involved with a farm.

You can volunteer for Lettuce Link by Solid Ground in Seattle to provide less fortunate families with fresh, organic produce.

L'arche and HUG (Hilltop Urban Gardens) in Tacoma provides volunteer gardening opportunities.

Left Foot Organics in Olympia has volunteer and employment opportunities.

Friends of the Farms on Bainbridge Island offers a variety of volunteer opportunities at their monthly work parties.

Don't rely on just these as the only opportunities out there. Continue to search the internet as new and updated information becomes available. But as you can see there is a diversity of opportunities await a dedicated volunteer who is eager to get their hands dirty.

Any tips for picking blueberries?

When you find a variety of blueberry that you enjoy, pick the bush clean! Look up at the top of the bush and look inside the bush to pick all the berries. Careful move limbs (without bending them too much) to look into the bush. It is amazing how much fruit can be hiding behind a few leaves!

To pick ripe berries, take a cluster in one hand and gentle roll your thumb over the berries.  The ripe berries will fall off into your hand (without a stem) while the unripe berries will stay on the bush.

A ripe berry will be entirely blue and should come off the bush without much effort. An unripe berry is green, entirely red, or has a red blush around the stem. Please leave these on the bush so others many pick and enjoy them in the future.

When picking berries, remember to be gentle to the plant - do not bend, break, or twist the branches. The future health of and the amount of fruit on the bushes depend on how the plants are treated by pickers.

Will blueberries ripen after being picked?

No, unlike peaches or bananas, blueberries do not ripen after being picked. If they are picked red or green they will not turn blue or become sweeter.

Do you use pesticides on your blueberry plants?

Pesticides have not been used on our plants since we have owned the farm (1998).

Environmental Working Groups's listed the "dirty dozen" of 2012. It lists the top 12 fruits and produce that you should buy organic. The dirty dozen had high levels of pesticide residue or multiple types pesticides, even after washing the produce. Blueberries made the list with one of the samples tested containing 13 types of pesticides. Learn more here and download a list of produce to buy organic and a list of safer choices.

Ick! There's a bug on my berries!

Though the farm is not certified organic, we choose not to spray our plants with poisonous chemicals. To make those tasty berries that we love, we rely on local native bumblebees to fertilize the flowers. Pesticides are non-discriminatory. If we sprayed pesticides in the field to control bugs that sometimes feed on or are found around the berries, we would harm our pollinators as well. In addition to concerns about harming our pollinators, we are concerned about the effects of pesticides on humans. Given the choice, we would much rather have a few insects crawling on the berries than having neurotoxic or carcinogenic chemicals coating our fruit. Click here to read more on this topic.

How many varieties of blueberry are at the farm?

At least 20 varieties of blueberries, which were planted in the 1940s (click here for more information), grow on our farm. There is only a total 50-60 varieties of blueberries in the world, and half of those are grown in the northern regions. So our farm hosts the majority of blueberry varieties grown in the northern region!

The berries are very different between varieties in size, shape, and taste. The plants of each variety also have a distinct growth pattern and ripening cycle. Some berries ripen early, while others ripen later in the season. For example, in our field, we have a popular commercial variety whose berries turn blue early in the season. However, those berries don't produce sugar and get sweet until much later (these berries are usually roped off during the U-pick season).

Since the majority of the field was planted before the commercialization of produce, most of the blueberry varieties must be hand-picked. Some blueberry varieties in our field are not typically found in grocery stores. So when you visit the field use your senses to taste and see the difference in our fruit.

What are those small, white, dried up berries?

Those are called mummy berries. A disease caused by a fungus can grow on the berries eventually drying out the berry, causing it to shrivel. When the mummy berries fall on the ground, they spread their spores, continuing their life cycle.

If you have any other questions or concerns, please contact us at farmer@linboblueberries.com or call (253) 229-6438.

Linbo Blueberry Farm
1201 South Fruitland, Puyallup, WA 98371
www.linboblueberries.com

page updated: 7/4/16